Monthly Archives: April 2016

A Blooming Trend in Grooming

More than luxurious spa treatments for well-pampered pets, natural grooming products are often practical products that serve a greater purpose.

 

Just as pet owners do not want their loved ones to ingest foods with artificial ingredients, they also do not want them to have chemicals on their skin and fur. With this in mind, manufacturers of natural grooming products are developing products that feature familiar ingredients that humans might find in their own shampoos, conditioners and other products.

According to Chicago-based research firm Mintel’s report, Pet Supplies – U.S. – June 2015, humanization of pets is still a dominant trend, and many of the new products launched in the past two years are pet versions of products made for people. The report specifically points to examples such as herbal shampoo, aromatherapy conditioner, probiotic supplements and cleansing wipes. The marketing copy for these items often uses terms such as “alpha hydroxyl acid” and “soothing scents,” the report authors wrote, and ingredients in these new products include essential oils, botanicals and other natural components.

For example, the newest product from New City, N.Y.-based Warren London is Exfoliating Butter Wash, which comes in two scents—Milk & Honey and Pomegranate & Fig. “With the overwhelming success of our Hydrating Butter Leave in Conditioner, which is one of the top-selling products on Amazon and used by groomers all over the world, we decided to release a similar Butter Wash, which not only has a powerful moisturizer, but will help to exfoliate the skin and coat while removing dead skin and hair,” says Eric Bittman, CEO and president.

Bittman says Warren London’s natural grooming products use high-end, cosmetic-grade ingredients to help solve certain issues for their pets. “Dry skin in dogs has been a huge problem,” he says. “We wanted to come out with a high-quality [product] but also using natural ingredients to keep their skin and coat feeling great.”

Bittman adds that consumers are increasingly looking for natural products that are made in the USA.

And consumers are clearly willing to pay more for these products. According to Mintel, while overall pet product sales remained flat over the years in unit sales, dollar sales went up overall. There is strong demand for premium and specialty products due to safety concerns after the pet-related recalls several years ago, plus there are pets with health problems or other special needs, and a general trend toward pampering pets.

Natural grooming products shoppers are typically comfortable with a medium to higher price point, says Brian Collier, marketing manager and key accounts manager for Wentzville, Mo.-based TropiClean. “Quality means more to [pet owners] than a bargain,” he says.

Also, the natural pet grooming products consumer wants ingredients that can easily be read and understood. “She is looking for products that provide a luxurious clean, with a lasting fragrance but don’t contain the harsh surfactants or chemicals,” explains Collier, noting that the natural pet product shopper is usually female, but that is changing as more men are buying quality products for their furry family members.

TropiClean recently redesigned its shampoo line and added a shampoo and conditioner. The Lime and Coconut shampoo and Lime and Cocoa Butter conditioner help nourish and moisturize the skin and coat, helping reduce shedding.

Also new is TropiClean’s Aimable Pet Shampoo, which offers a fast wash and rinse. “One of the most important things we learned is that pet parents do not like bathing their dogs,” says Collier. “As much bonding as this time together can bring, it is messy, challenging, hurts their back and takes a long time.”

Aimable Pet Shampoo is packaged in pouches to allow the human to lather the pet all around their coat for complete coverage. Each pouch comes in a 12-oz. patent-pending flexible package, and there are three fragrances.

“Our goal is to provide every pet parent with the perfect solution for bath time and between the baths,” says Collier. “Our new line up does just that, and we are excited to see continued growth in the natural grooming category.”

TropiClean’s new Between the Baths line includes Waterless Foaming Shampoos, Deodorizing Pet Sprays, Ear Cleaners, Wipes, Tangle Remover and more. Building on the success of its Neem & Citrus Flea and Tick shampoo, the company also launched a Natural Flea & Tick line. Each product and solution is infused with nature’s pest-fighting ingredients, including lemongrass and sesame oil. The natural formula does not contain pyrethrin or permethrin while still effectively killing fleas, larvae, eggs and ticks by contact.

“As we began to look at the current landscape of full-line natural flea and tick solutions in the market today, we felt that there was a void in current offerings and an opportunity for us to use our experience in natural solutions to create something special for pet parents,” says Collier. “Pet parents want something that is safe to use on their pets and safe to use around their home.”

Natural flea and tick products represent a growing category in the pet industry. According to the Greenwich, Conn.-based American Pet Products Association’s (APPA) 2015-2016 APPA National Pet Owners Survey, eight percent of dog owners and nine percent of cat owners purchased all-natural, chemical-free flea and tick products in 2014. For the cat owners, this percentage almost doubled compared to 2012, when five percent bought the products.

Some pet owners want to give their dogs something more indulgent at bath time, so they buy spa treatments such as mud. For these consumers, Madra Mór Canine Spa Treatments recently added 10 oz. (296 ml) retail pouches for consumers to use at home.

“The back of the pouch explains how many washes, benefits, made in the USA and we are waiting on our non-provisional patent number, so patent pending,” says Jackie Hynes, president of Madra Mór in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.

Hynes says the spa treatment is a supportive skin cleanser for between visits to the groomer. Retailers and groomers can display the 10-oz. pouches the way human spas merchandise products for clients to use at home. “Our mud treatments are also ideal for specialty stores that transition or upgrade the quality of the food, helping stop the itching and scratching externally,” she says.

There is new packaging for the groomers too. The mud treatments are spreadable and have rich ingredients, so they are thick, Hynes says. Professional groomers offered feedback about the difficulty of getting the mud out of the narrow J-jug, so now Madra Mór’s gallons are in convenient, large-mouth pails to make dispensing easier. Also, with the pails, Madra Mór includes a measuring scoop/dish. “The professional or pet parent can scoop only the amount needed for the treatment and bring the dish to the tub for easy applying,” she says. “The response has been fantastic.”

To keep dogs’ faces beautiful, Angels’ Eyes, which is based in Sunrise, Fla., makes tear-stain products that can be used in both shedding and non-shedding dogs and cats. Among the company’s most popular products is the Beef Plus powder, which consists of 100-percent natural ingredients. The company is launching Beef Plus tear-stain product in a chew form.

“By popular demand our customers have asked us to manufacture our beef plus tear stain product in a chew form,” says Lynda Winkowski, president of Angels’ Eyes. “The consumer seems to prefer the ease of giving their pet a remedy in a chew form because it is simple and easy.”

The product uses a proprietary blend of natural antioxidants and help support the normal inflammatory response. They are made in the USA, and they carry the NASC seal, the quality seal from the National Animal Supplement Council. “This seal is important to the consumers to insure that they are getting an excellent product,” says Winkowski.

Rewarding Your Dog With Praise Over Petting May Leave Your Relationship Lacking

Rewarding Your Dog With Praise Over Petting May Leave Your Relationship Lacking by Tori Holmes, writer at BarkPost

When it comes to receiving praise for a job well done, you probably have a preference for either a verbal or physical congratulation. Some people want a hug or a high five, whereas others only need to hear how well they’ve done. As it turns out, dogs have a preference too.

pitty-being-petted

Source: I Heart Dogs

A recent study led by Dr. Clive Wynne at Arizona State University found that when it comes to being rewarded, dogs prefer petting over verbal praise.

sqinty

To determine this, the researchers organized a two-part study. In the first section, 42 shelter and pet dogs were observed while spending time alone with two individuals. One of the individuals gave the dog verbal praise and the second individual pet them. The amount of time the dog then chose to spend with each person was measured.

giphy

In the second section, 72 shelter and pet dogs individually spent time alone with one person. For the shelter dogs, the person they were with was a stranger, but for the pet dog it was their owner.

Each dog participated in eight three-minute sessions with the person. During these sessions, they received petting, praising, petting and praising, or nothing.

Screen Shot 2016-04-15 at 12

After analyzing the results, the researchers found that the dogs showed more interest in the people that pet them. What was even more surprising is that the dogs seemed to show no more interest in the person giving them verbal praise than the person they had no interaction with.

Screen Shot 2016-04-15 at 12

Does this mean showering your dog with praise is useless? Not quite. Combining verbal praise with someone like a food reward is a great way to increase your dog’s appreciation of praise. Once they learn that vocal praise comes with a side of tasty treats, they will learn to appreciate it more even if the food is removed.

giphy-1

Source: Gifbay

Next time you want to acknowledge how amazing your pup is, make sure that you choose petting over praise to really get the point across. If the results of this study are true, telling your dog how awesome they are is about as beneficial as saying nothing at all!

H/t to Huffington Post

Tar and Sulfur Shampoo

Check out our Tar and Sulfur shampoo on our website here: http://shop.naturesspecialtiesmfg.com/TAR-SULFUR-WITH-ALOE-SHAMPOO-FOR-DOG_c52.htm

tar_sulfer_ad_v3

Although tar and sulfur products have been used for many years in veterinary medicine to treat various skin problems, many were pulled from shelves linked to being carcinogenic. You can rest assured that Nature’s Specialties Tar & Sulfur Shampoo is safe since we use only the highest quality USP Refined Topical Coal Tar and Bio Sulfur along with Aloe Vera and other nutrients in a mild deep cleansing base. Since it naturally works as an exfoliating, antifungal agent and aids in the relief of the itching and discomfort of psoriasis, seborrhea, eczema and extreme dry flaky skin. It also helps stop and restore hair loss and may also be used for a condition called “scratches” a fungus found on horse’s legs. DO NOT USE ON CATS. Safe to use on dogs,horses.

11 Reasons Your Dog Loves To Destroy Their Toys!

11 Reasons Your Dog Loves To Destroy Their Toys! by Megan Loiselle, writer at BarkPost

We’ve all seen the DogShaming photos on social media, showcasing the destruction caused by our loving canines who tore apart their precious toys. Do you ever leave your house only to come back later to a disaster, with your dog sitting idly by as if nothing happened? How about giving your dog toys, and they tear them apart in seconds?

dogtoydestroy

It’s no secret that dogs love their toys, but even so they manage to destroy them. But the behavior is perfectly natural, since your dogs don’t really see toys as toys. For your pup, a brand new, perfectly intact toy is nothing other than a vessel for their primal instincts!

So here are 11 reasons your K9 counterparts love to destroy their toys!

1.Boredom

dogboredom

For one, boredom! Dogs get bored, and when they do, they need to entertain themselves, and sometimes, it’s not in a way that you’ll appreciate.

2. We Trained Them Too

husky

Another reason is we taught them to destroy things. When you get a puppy, the way they aggressively go after their toys is adorable to us, so without knowing it, we tend to encourage it, and this leads to them to continue on the path to destruction.

3. They Get The Toy Whenever They Want

dogtoyseverywhere

A dog that can get at his toys all of the time will eventually tear them apart. I mean, what do you really expect? It should instead be a reward rather than something enjoyable that they just get to have because they’re the best and we love them.

4. Toys Aren’t Built To Last Forever

ares

We all love those cute plush toys, especially the ones designed for the holidays, because what’s a holiday if we aren’t celebrating with our dogs? But toys are not designed to last forever. They’re designed to be destroyed, SAFELY, by your dog, since that’s what dogs do.

5. Frustration & Stress

dogstress

Your dog is capable of getting frustrated, and when he/she does, they look for ways to relieve that frustration. For them, destroying something close by can do this, even if it is their precious toy. Stress does the same thing to them, and they can’t express themselves with words, their actions say it all!

6. Toy Isn’t Rotated

dogtoyrotate

To keep toys lasting longer, rotate them to give each individual toy a longer life! (But no promises of toy “immortality” here!

7. Dogs Like It

ellen

Similar to us training dogs to destroy things while they’re young, they might enjoy the actual act on their own. For us it’s a mess, for them, it’s fun!

8. Lack of Mental and Physical Stimulation

nobaddog

Similar to boredom, if play time isn’t interactive enough or doesn’t burn enough energy. You need to have toys for your dog that make them use their mind, they like to think, and they suffer when you don’t stimulate their brain. Similar to this, if you’re not exercising them, they’re going to find something to get rid of that extra energy.

9. Separation Anxiety

doganxiety

Our pets can feel what we’re feeling. If we feel bad or worried for them, they know and they catch on. Because of this, more and more dogs are getting separation anxiety. This is a big reason why dogs destroy toys, but don’t worry, you can train them out of it! Keep working hard, to keep them happy, and teach them that it’s okay to be alone.

10. You Have A Heavy Chewer

dogchewer

Don’t be fooled by your dogs size, even if they’re little, they can still chew with the best of them. A Chihuahua isn’t necessarily going to be happy with a plush, he might need a hard strong toy too! Get toys that work with your dogs personality, and give them toys that work with their chew style.

11. That Killer Instinct

bane

This is probably the most interesting of all reasons. You know those squeaky toys that your dog goes crazy for? The squeak in the toy is meant to represent a dying animal, so for them, they’re tearing apart their prey. They’re still descendants of wolves, and domestic or not, it’s their natural instinct.

Featured image via @bellet634 /Instagram

11 Reasons Your Dog Loves To Destroy Their Toys!

11 Reasons Your Dog Loves To Destroy Their Toys! by Megan Loiselle, writer at BarkPost

We’ve all seen the DogShaming photos on social media, showcasing the destruction caused by our loving canines who tore apart their precious toys. Do you ever leave your house only to come back later to a disaster, with your dog sitting idly by as if nothing happened? How about giving your dog toys, and they tear them apart in seconds?

dogtoydestroy

It’s no secret that dogs love their toys, but even so they manage to destroy them. But the behavior is perfectly natural, since your dogs don’t really see toys as toys. For your pup, a brand new, perfectly intact toy is nothing other than a vessel for their primal instincts!

So here are 11 reasons your K9 counterparts love to destroy their toys!

  1. Boredom
dogboredom

For one, boredom! Dogs get bored, and when they do, they need to entertain themselves, and sometimes, it’s not in a way that you’ll appreciate.

2. We Trained Them Too

husky

Another reason is we taught them to destroy things. When you get a puppy, the way they aggressively go after their toys is adorable to us, so without knowing it, we tend to encourage it, and this leads to them to continue on the path to destruction.

3. They Get The Toy Whenever They Want

dogtoyseverywhere

A dog that can get at his toys all of the time will eventually tear them apart. I mean, what do you really expect? It should instead be a reward rather than something enjoyable that they just get to have because they’re the best and we love them.

4. Toys Aren’t Built To Last Forever

ares

We all love those cute plush toys, especially the ones designed for the holidays, because what’s a holiday if we aren’t celebrating with our dogs? But toys are not designed to last forever. They’re designed to be destroyed, SAFELY, by your dog, since that’s what dogs do.

5. Frustration & Stress

dogstress

Your dog is capable of getting frustrated, and when he/she does, they look for ways to relieve that frustration. For them, destroying something close by can do this, even if it is their precious toy. Stress does the same thing to them, and they can’t express themselves with words, their actions say it all!

6. Toy Isn’t Rotated

dogtoyrotate

To keep toys lasting longer, rotate them to give each individual toy a longer life! (But no promises of toy “immortality” here!

7. Dogs Like It

ellen

Similar to us training dogs to destroy things while they’re young, they might enjoy the actual act on their own. For us it’s a mess, for them, it’s fun!

8. Lack of Mental and Physical Stimulation

nobaddog

Similar to boredom, if play time isn’t interactive enough or doesn’t burn enough energy. You need to have toys for your dog that make them use their mind, they like to think, and they suffer when you don’t stimulate their brain. Similar to this, if you’re not exercising them, they’re going to find something to get rid of that extra energy.

9. Separation Anxiety

doganxiety

Our pets can feel what we’re feeling. If we feel bad or worried for them, they know and they catch on. Because of this, more and more dogs are getting separation anxiety. This is a big reason why dogs destroy toys, but don’t worry, you can train them out of it! Keep working hard, to keep them happy, and teach them that it’s okay to be alone.

10. You Have A Heavy Chewer

dogchewer

Don’t be fooled by your dogs size, even if they’re little, they can still chew with the best of them. A Chihuahua isn’t necessarily going to be happy with a plush, he might need a hard strong toy too! Get toys that work with your dogs personality, and give them toys that work with their chew style.

11. That Killer Instinct

bane

This is probably the most interesting of all reasons. You know those squeaky toys that your dog goes crazy for? The squeak in the toy is meant to represent a dying animal, so for them, they’re tearing apart their prey. They’re still descendants of wolves, and domestic or not, it’s their natural instinct.

Featured image via @bellet634 /Instagram

150 Years Ago Your Dog’s “Breed” Didn’t Even Exist

150 Years Ago Your Dog’s “Breed” Didn’t Even Exist by Tori Holmes, writer at BarkPost

Dogs may have been man’s best friends for thousands of years, but the furry creatures we keep today are nothing like the dogs of yester-year. This is because nearly all of the dog breeds we know and love actually didn’t exist until relatively recently.

dog-emgn-19

Source: EMGN.com

Believe it or not, but the majority of dog breeds today can only be traced back about 150 years to Victorian Era England. This is a very small period of time.

how-some-dog-breeds-have-changed-over-a-century-11-photos-10

Source: The Chive

In the Victoria Era, the idea of a dogs “breed” had more to do with the work they performed rather than their appearance. Dogs were categorized based on their propensity to hunt, to pull carts, to do farm work, and other such jobs. While there may have been some similarity in the appearance of the dogs in each category, there was no distinct “breeds”.

Screen Shot 2016-04-07 at 12

Source: Retriever Man

This began to change around the same time that our relationship with canines began to change. During the mid-19th century, England was in the thick of the Industrial Revolution, expanding their global empire, and hygiene reforms were instated that required farm animals to be relocated from the city. When choosing which animals to relocate, dogs were one of the lucky species that were invited to stay. It was this decision that changed our relationships with dogs forever.

Bull-Terrier-1915

After the farm animals had left the city, the dog’s place in society flipped. No longer were they just working animals meant to live outside with the other farm animals; they were invited inside the homes of their owners as pets. Dogs that were left outside became strays that, in the eyes of the public, needed saving.

ch-florentius

Source: Retriever Man

Overtime our relationships with dogs became more personal; they began to be seen as something that could be molded by humans to display specific traits. This resulted in “designing” dogs to become a popular hobby.

Screen Shot 2016-04-07 at 12

Source: The Chive

As dogs began to be bred to display these selective traits, kennel clubs started to be established to oversee the dog shows that presented these newly designed dogs. They were also in charge of developing a strict “stud book”, or registry of each breeds lineage.

31F642F100000578-3480780-Early_Pugs_pictured_derived_from_Chinese_happa_dogs_that_were_br-a-13_1457402059734

Source: The Chive

The Victorian Era’s systematic organization of dogs led to the development of many of today’s most popular breeds, such as Golden Retrievers and English Setters. Today, we continue to add new breeds to these registries, as well as tweak breeding practices and standards to improve the health of breeds, such as the Olde English Bulldogge.

H/t to Tech Insider

Featured image from SSPL via Daily Mail